Did the Ancient Jews Practice Crucifixion?

Joshua impaled some six or seven people during the conquest of Canaan as well. Crucifixion per se, hard to tell. He did remove them before sundown as the Deuteronomic statement that those hung upon a tree overnight would be cursed. A very good article you have, as many people seem unaware (or they flat out disbelieve you) if you tell them that Jews did practice crucifixion from time to time.

The Musings of Thomas Verenna

Last night during one of our class discussions on the historical Jesus, the question came up over crucifixion; someone had made the claim that only the Romans had practiced it.  But is that really the case?  Were the Romans really the only people in antiquity to use crucifixion as a form of punishment?  Well, actually, no.

First, crucifixion was not necessarily standardized.  The Greek word used in the New Testament, for example, to explain Jesus’ death is σταυρός (and cognates, e.g., Mark 16.6; ἐσταυρωμένον) which literally meant a ‘stake’, with which to impale someone.  This process could be done in a variety of ways and according to written tradition, some Roman rulers did experiment with all sorts of manners of crucifying their enemies.  It is important though that the two basic elements generally remain the same: the plank(s) or beam(s) of wood and something with which to impale the flesh…

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